From Twitter to Real Life: Making Connections

Nicetomeetyoualfredn2_2Over the last several months I’ve experienced a phenomenon that has yet to be named:  Meeting people in person who I had previously only known through Twitter.  It started by meeting folks at social media events in the Boston area (thanks to breakfasts organized by Bryan Person @bryanperson and an evening event sponsored by EMC and Len Devanna @LenDevanna).  I’ve met numerous folks, all I would describe as "good eggs" – from Ami Chitwood @achitwood, leading internal knowledge management at a large consulting firm to the Twitter gurus of the Mzinga crew including Aaron Strout @astrout and Jim Storer @jstorerj to most recently meeting Amy Worley @worleygirl, Director of Interactive Marketing for H&R Block, at the Forrester Marketing Forum.

Here’s one story that jumps high in the "coolness factor" of that twitter to real life experience. 

Months ago when I started on Twitter, I spotted Phillip Zannini @phillymac, an enthusiastic video blogger, Red Sox/Patriots fan, talented interactive designer and all around good family guy.  This week, we both posted that we would be heading to Cleveland.  On Monday, I found out he has accepted a position working at Brulant, the same company.  <cue shameless plug>  I am a partner in our Consumer Product and Retail vertical, focusing on clients in NJ and Michigan while working to expand our presence in the Northeast.  <end shameless plug> One area I have not been as involved in to date is recruiting and staffing in the interactive marketing side of our practice.  Phillip started on Monday and actually used Twitter to DM me once we started to connect the dots:

DM string:
adamcohen:  What’s up in Cleveland? I’m flying there tomorrow AM for a couple days
phillymac: Start my new gig at 9:00am, flying home Thursday evening.
…later…
phillymac: I just started working for Brulant. Are you the same Adam Cohen that is in their directory?
phillymac: Ha! You are! I just checked your blog again and it’s the same picture. That’s just TOO funny.
adamcohen: Dude, are you serious about Brulant? Y, I’m a partner there but based in Boston. Are you at Park East in Beachwood?

I was able to grab some time to hear about his background and his experience plugging in with our team.  For me this is my best story about moving from Twitter to a building a much more personal connection.  I look forward to having Phillip as a great part of our team and we’re fortunate to have him aboard.  Last thing I expected was to have someone hired by my company who I had met through Twitter – without me knowing.

Have a good twitter connection story to share?

Photo: AlfredN via Flickr.

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  • Excellent story!

  • Excellent story!

  • This is a brilliant story and one that I bet can be echoed more and more. There is something energizing about people connecting, not just meeting, but connecting on an idea, an experience, a geography.
    I think it’s a sense of not being alone.

  • This is a brilliant story and one that I bet can be echoed more and more. There is something energizing about people connecting, not just meeting, but connecting on an idea, an experience, a geography.

    I think it’s a sense of not being alone.

  • What a cool story. Two great twitter guys from New England that meet up in Cleveland. Small world! I am continually amazed at how many twitter people from different circles seem to know each, both on twitter and in real life. It seems that Twitter is just one big Venn diagram.

  • What a cool story. Two great twitter guys from New England that meet up in Cleveland. Small world! I am continually amazed at how many twitter people from different circles seem to know each, both on twitter and in real life. It seems that Twitter is just one big Venn diagram.

  • Well, not about Twitter, but along these lines…
    I’ll have to try it now (great, another technology to scoop into my already overcrowded brain).
    Ever hear of this thing called Internet Relay Chat? You couldn’t see the people or know anything about them — all text and very rowdy. I was doing support for Linux via IRC in 1994. Did it for several years and along the way got to “know” a few dozen souls, many of whiich ended up having real cool jobs ™ in the dot-com era. Many are still employed in Linux companies.
    I ran into a few of them in meat space (a Gibson term, meaning our reality, not the Matrix — I swear!) as I inevitably ended up at trade shows and events as Linux grew up from the wierd little geek toy into something much bigger. It was always jarring — your mind has ways of painting mental pictures of people that simply don’t come out in text.
    Conversely, people who are rowdy and personable in IRC space can be amazingly shy in person.
    I’m an exception here — I’m rowdy in box contexts
    Anyway, just sharing,
    –Paul Ferris

  • Well, not about Twitter, but along these lines…

    I’ll have to try it now (great, another technology to scoop into my already overcrowded brain).

    Ever hear of this thing called Internet Relay Chat? You couldn’t see the people or know anything about them — all text and very rowdy. I was doing support for Linux via IRC in 1994. Did it for several years and along the way got to “know” a few dozen souls, many of whiich ended up having real cool jobs ™ in the dot-com era. Many are still employed in Linux companies.

    I ran into a few of them in meat space (a Gibson term, meaning our reality, not the Matrix — I swear!) as I inevitably ended up at trade shows and events as Linux grew up from the wierd little geek toy into something much bigger. It was always jarring — your mind has ways of painting mental pictures of people that simply don’t come out in text.

    Conversely, people who are rowdy and personable in IRC space can be amazingly shy in person.

    I’m an exception here — I’m rowdy in box contexts

    Anyway, just sharing,
    –Paul Ferris